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Ottawa approves Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline

The federal Conservative government has approved Enbridge's Northern Gateway oil pipeline project, despite widespread opposition in B.C. that includes the provincial government, First Nations, environmental organizations and residents of the intended oil tanker port of Kitimat.

Natural Resources Minister Greg Rickford signalled the government's approval in a low-key statement Tuesday that endorsed the 209 conditions imposed by a federal review. Rickford noted that the proponent still needs to consult with aboriginal communities and secure provincial permits.

The project doesn't yet meet Premier Christy Clark's five conditions for new heavy oil pipelines, which include world leading marine and land spill protections, resolution of aboriginal concerns and a fair share of benefits for B.C.

B.C. Environment Minister Mary Polak said the decision means the project meets the first of five conditions required by the province, a successful federal review.

"We recognize the benefits that the Northern Gateway project may bring, but they will not be at the expense of our environment," Polak said.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has emphasized it is in the national interest to open a new pipeline route to the Pacific Ocean to carry Alberta oil sands bitumen and break the Canadian oil industry's dependence on U.S. markets.

But a continuing battle over the pipeline plan is expected in the courts, and potentially on the land, where civil disobedience has already been threatened.

Opposition demands to reject the project dominated question period in the House of Commons Tuesday. NDP leader Thomas Mulcair called the review panel process "a sham," and Skeena-Bulkley Valley NDP MP Nathan Cullen warned that opposition in B.C. may upset plans to develop liquefied natural gas exports in the province.

The decision by the Harper cabinet follows last December's ruling by a federal review panel that the $6.8-billion project should proceed, subject to 209 conditions.

That followed Enbridge's earlier pledges to improve the project's safety with thicker steel and other measures along the 1,177-kilometre route.

The twin pipelines would carry 525,000 barrels per day of diluted bitumen from the oil sands west to Kitimat and send condensate to act as a thinning agent east to Alberta.

 

MORE ON NORTHERN GATEWAY
Interactive timeline (full screen)
Project chronology
Facts and figures

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED
B.C. spells out five pipeline conditions (July 2012)
Province rejects Northern Gateway plan as inadequate (May 2013)
Review panel recommends pipeline proceed (Dec 2013)
Critics say Enbridge will hit wall of opposition in B.C. (Dec 2013)
Kitmat residents vote 58 % against (April 2014)
Scientists rap Enbridge pipeline review (June 2014)

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